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Technology Trends from the Trenches of Enterprise IT

I’ve moderated and presented the closing keynote at the largest global gathering of information security professionals for the past two years. It gives me insight to what they see as emerging technologies, issues, and dangers.

This is an unusual conference. A task force guided the producers to stage a three day global meeting that departs from the typical talking heads and death by PowerPoint. Incisive interviews, extremely well-moderated panels, and audience interaction are the norm. This year there was an especially intriguing hands-on session co-led by IDEO and Deloitte on how to provide the right space for innovation within organizations.

In 2011 the huge buzzword was “Cloud.” It was so pronounced that by the third day we were joking about avoiding the “c-word.” This year the cloud was taken as a matter of fact, a reality that all executives (CIO’s, CISO’s, VP-level info security types, and consultants) take in stride and provide for in information security tactics. Here are some other salient tech trends from the conference:

  • SAAS – using the cloud, “software as a service” is now reality in many organizations. Google’s penetration with Google Docs into large enterprises or sales departments’ non-IT-aided implementation of SalesForce are both examples.

  • BYOD – lots of acronyms, right? “Bring your own device.” Workers want to use their personal technology-du-jour on the job. That means organizations can’t mandate Berries but have to adjust to iPhones, Droids, and the various tablets as accessing sensitive company information.

  • Big Data – this has been around in various forms, most often in the term “data-mining” for well over a decade. But now there are accessible, pragmatic tools to allow organizations to probe their mountains of data for patterns, opportunities, and profit generation.

Six years ago, on the eve of the Great Recession, a financial services CEO criticized me bitterly for engaging her board in scenarios that forecasted the possibility of individual customer experiences or products. Today large financial institutions can use Hadoop to gather information and do exactly what I posed as a possibility. That exec, incidentally, no longer heads that organization.