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Food

The Drought and Farmer Viewpoints

It’s been almost two decades since I first worked with a bunch of smart farmers who lead their state associations for the corn and soybean commodities. I’ve learned their business, watched them navigate a series of farm legislations, try to wean themselves away from government subsidies, and then prosper as prices came up dramatically over the past five years.

This year I returned to the same gathering for a fresh class of state association leaders. I didn’t know quite what to expect in a severe, brutal drought. I talked with some producers who were not going to harvest much of a crop. A very few lucky farmers located further north in the country or in the relatively moist East are going to do extremely well. But even the unlucky were optimistic as one can only be when you put almost everything in your business on the line every year and throw yourself on the mercy of nature.

If you want to see an example of resilience listen to these men and women as they talk about their ground, the crops, and their plans for the future. Certainly crop insurance plays into the situation. But they firm their jaws, speak frankly about the risks, and when asked about another drought “event” (that’s the term they use) they become gravely contemplative.
“That would take us back to zero,” one farmer told me. Another said, “We could deal with that but we’re probably going to sit back and see how the winter reestablishes our moisture before we even decide to plant next year.” The implications are serious for food supplies, energy prices, global trade.

If the breadbasket of America was to see anything similar to the conditions that have ravaged Texas for almost a decade we might look at food security suddenly becoming a strategic concern. The executive branch might need to step into the farm situation instead of allowing Congress to continue to argue over food stamps for the poor instead of providing a safety net for the people who feed the country.

Tracking, January 2011

A new year and new blips on the radar screen in our practice. I post items here from time to time that we’re watching because of our scanning, clients, or upcoming engagements.

Food Prices - for well over two years we’ve tracked a steady uptick in worldwide food prices. One visual element in our briefings and conference presentations is the UN’s index of world prices which shows a steady climb that now has exceeded the “trigger point” of 2007-08.

What do we mean by “trigger point?” When riots occur in less developed nations over food. Large portions of the population in these countries spend 50% or more of their incomes on food. This is a ticking time bomb that has been known to overthrow governments and even cause wars.

The
“North Atlantic Recession” - come on, it is no longer a global recession or even the “Great Recession” when you view it from Brazil, India, or China. It’s the recession that still either cripples or impedes the US and the EU. Even Canada is out and expanding.

The
“Employment Follies” - how badly can a government manipulate statistics? Just look at the jobless in America. OK, every governing administration wants to make the news better but creating 65,000 jobs in a month when it’s going to take over a quarter million new jobs every 30 days to get back to something like 5% unemployment is not good news. Especially when most of the jobs are in hotels, restaurant kitchens, or temporary services. Employment is a key trend for America’s return to economic health. We should be realistic about it.